The Benefits of Drumming

The word rhythm in Greek means to flow. Drumming is a path of healing that guides us into experiencing the flow of our mind and emotions so we may grow to experience more about our soul.
African Drum Painting

Synced Rhythm, Masoud – Tanzania

Drumming gives us an experience where we can be free to connect with ourselves and others, in order to release, restore and heal. It is a universal language where all people can be a part, free from words and concepts so we can experience life with an open heart.
Drumming supports individuals, families and communities during times of joy, sadness and change. As we drum together the rhythm can bring us closer to one another with respect and courage as we move towards healing wounds and restoring hope.

Therapeutic Effects

Current research now shows the therapeutic effects of drumming techniques. Research indicates that drumming accelerates physical healing, boosts the immune system. In addition specific studies conducted by professionals in the fields of music therapy and mental health show us that drumming:

  • Reduces tension, anxiety and stress
  • Helps control chronic pain
  • Boosts the immune system
  • Releases negative feelings, blockages and emotional trauma

In a specific study conducted by Barry Bittman, MD, group drumming actually increases cancer-killing cells, which help the body combat cancer as well as many other viruses.

Life Quality Effects

Drumming induces deep relaxation, lowers blood pressure, produces feelings of well-being, a release of emotional trauma and reduces stress.

Stress, according to current medical research, contributes to nearly all diseases and is a primary cause of such life-threatening illnesses as heart attacks, strokes and immune system breakdowns. Chronic pain, which many of our veterans experience, has a progressively draining effect on the quality of life.

Research suggests that drumming serves as a distraction from pain and grief. Specifically, drumming promotes the production of endorphins and endogenous opiates, the bodies own morphine-like pain killers, and can thereby help to control pain.

Community Effects

Drum Circles also provide an opportunity for participants to feel connected with others and gain a sense of interpersonal support. A drum circle provides an opportunity to connect with your own spirit at a deeper level. Group drumming alleviates self-centeredness, isolation and alienation. There are great benefits to feeling connected to others, especially those in similar situations.

Specific studies show:

  • Creates a sense of connectedness with self and others
  • Helps us experience being in resonance with the natural rhythms of life
  • Provides a medium for individual self-realization